http://www.dlapiper.com/en/us/insights/publications/2014/04/in-the-wake-of-mccutcheon/

 

 

By Allison Davis, Reporter.

William & Mary’s Election Law Program and DC Vote co-hosted a symposium on Rethinking DC Representation in Congress on February 21, 2014 in Washington, DC. The symposium impaneled several highly regarded Constitutional law experts and voting rights advocates. Read more

What is the impact of McCutcheon on state campaign finance laws? We’re starting to see some glimpses of what might be coming down the pipeline now that the Supreme Court has ruled aggregate limits on donations unconstitutional:

http://www.publicintegrity.org/2014/04/04/14517/mccutcheon-ruling-may-affect-contribution-limits-many-20-states

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/04/04/us-usa-court-election-analysis-idUSBREA3308620140404

 

Ken Gross and Allison Davis (WM Law ’16) are featured discussing the possible impacts of McCutcheon on state campaign finance laws in the Election Law Program’s latest module at www.electionlawissues.org.

By Sarah Wiley

On Thursday February 27, William and Mary Law School hosted its Eighth Annual Election Law Symposium, featuring three preeminent attorneys in the field who gave a talk on the possible effects of McCutcheon v. FEC on campaign finance. Before the symposium itself, however, one of the panelists, Kenneth Gross (partner at Skadden, Arps, Slate & Flom LLP & Affiliates) sat down for an interview with ELS Symposium Co-Chair 1L Allison Davis.

In the interview, Mr. Gross explained that modern campaign finance law emerged in the wake of the Watergate scandals in the early 1970s. The first major case, Buckley v. Valeo, established the principle that political contributions are speech, so the government needs a pretty compelling reason to regulate them. The case drew a distinction between independent expenditures, which cannot be regulated, and political contributions which can, to an extent. Read more

February 26, 2014 | | Leave a Comment

Mr. Kenneth A. Gross is a former associate general counsel for the Federal Election Commission (FEC) and is now a partner at Skadden where he leads the political law practice, and advises corporations on political given. He will be one of three speakers at William & Mary on Thursday, February 27 on the impact of McCutchen on political giving.

Read more

height.182.no_border.width.320Mr. Lawrence “Larry” Noble is a highly regarded attorney and authority in the field of election law. In particular, his work in campaign ethics and finance is frequently referenced. He will speak at William & Mary this Thursday, Feb. 27th, on the state of political giving post-McCutcheon. Read more

From the press release:

The William & Mary Election Law Program will convene leading election law practitioners, scholars, and politicians in Washington, D.C., on February 21 for a program titled “Rethinking D.C. Representation in Congress.”

“This symposium draws together a group of highly prestigious thought leaders to re-ignite the question of Congressional representation for residents of the District of Columbia” said Rebecca Green, Co-Director of the Election Law Program at William & Mary. Read more

By Jane Miller

 

The United States Census Bureau reports that Americans aged 18-24 have the lowest voter registration rate of any age group.  Only 53.6% of U.S. citizens in that age group were registered to vote as of November 2012.  By contrast, more than 79% of citizens aged 65 and older were registered.  These disparate numbers raise questions about the health of our nation’s civic culture and the fairness of our elections, a concern so real it made it into an episode of The West Wing. Read more

By Ann Zachariah

 

The victor in Virginia’s attorney general race was up in the air well into December.  Localities had until November 12 to turn in the results of the contest between Sen. Mark Obenshain and Sen. Mark Herring.  One of the delays in declaring a winner arose from a problem in Fairfax County, where a discrepancy in absentee votes was uncovered.  In the 8th District in Fairfax County, only 50 percent of absentee ballots that were requested were cast compared to 88 percent in the 10th District and 86 percent in the 11th District. Read more

By Brad Smith

Fusion voting, or collateral endorsement, is the process through which a candidate for public office can be listed as the candidate for more than one party. This process was very common in thenineteenth century, although today it is an uncommon practice, and New York Is the only state where fusion voting has a noticeable impact. In recent months, however, New York politicians have debated the usefulness and wisdom of the practice. Read more


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